New Nanolaser Key To Future Optical Computers And Technologies

New Nanolaser Key To Future Optical Computers And Technologies

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Weather

Getting a little better. Hopefully the paws won’t be as muddy.

BillShrink.com

This is a neat web site that can really save some cash.

iPhone Rival

Highlights

2.8-inch touch screen, with four times the resolution of most phones.
Powered by Windows Mobile6.1 Professional.
Next generation TouchFLOuser interface, responding perfectly to your finger gestures when scrolling through contacts, browsing the web and launching media.
Small, lightweight design available in a range of vibrant colours.
Surf and download at broadband speed with HSDPA internet connectivity.
3.2 megapixel camera for quality stills and video.
microSDslot for expandable storage.

Jupiter-Shaped Planetarium for a Starry Bath

Jupiter-Shaped Planetarium for a Starry Bath

From Sega Toys, the company that made the popular home planetarium (and it’s miniature) is a new bathtime version called Homestar Spa. It’s shaped like the planet Jupiter, and it’ll make your entire bathroom into a starry wonder world for just over 7,000 yen.

Homestar Spa also has rose petal mode and deep sea mode for those of you whose ideal bathing experience is not a starry night, but a rose-filled bath or frolicking in the ocean with rare
aquatic species. via Toyko Mango

Great iTunes Plugin

http://iconcertcal.com/

Samsung ultra-fast, cheap 256GB SSD due this year

Source electronista

Samsung late on Sunday promised what it says is a breakthrough in solid-state drives with the launch of its first 256GB SSD. The drive offers twice the capacity of the Korean firm’s previous 128GB SSD but is also much faster. The 256GB edition reads sequential data at 200MB per second, twice the rate of the original model, while also seeing an even greater increase in write speeds: where the earlier drive writes at 70MB per second, the new SSD writes at 160MB per second. This comes in a chassis that is also described as one of Samsung’s thinnest at 9.5mm (0.37in), making it suitable for very thin and light notebooks.

More important still is the cost of the technology behind the drive, Samsung says. Rather than use costly single-level cell (SLC) technology, the company has managed to develop a multi-level cell (MLC) storage drive that transfers as quickly as the best SLC storage while costing much less to produce than past SSDs. Improvements to the storage controller have also extended the longevity to as long as SLC drives, giving the 256GB drive longevity as good or better than some rotating hard disks.